Theonomy, Christian Reconstruction, and the 1689

Junior over at The Confessing Baptist posted an article a couple of years ago that has recently become incredibly pertinent.  The primary question to be answered is:

Is the Theonomic view of the Mosaic “Judicial Law” consistent with the Reformed tradition? 

“This is a pressing question for Theonomists. On the one hand, in asserting “the abiding validity of the law in exhaustive detail” they appear to teach the binding obligation of the “judicial law” of Moses on society today. On the other hand, the divines of the Westminster Assembly and Calvin, their mentor, clearly teach the “expiration” of the judicial law of Moses and deny that it is as such binding on nations today. The critical statement in the Westminster Confession of Faith is found in 19:4. Having clearly distinguished the moral, ceremonial, and judicial law, the Confession states, “To them also, as a body politic, He gave sundry judicial laws, which expired together with the State of that people; not obliging any other now, further than the general equity thereof may require.” Calvin elaborates on this very point in his Institutes. His statements are so similar to that of the Confession that it is probable that here as in so many other places he had a formative impact on the Confession.”

Head over and check out the rest of the article, including audio, here.

[Contributed by Landon Chapman]

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